Statement

Using painting, sculpture, and other media, I create installations that engage personal and shared histories to examine how knowledge, memory, and history are constructed and mediated. While research-based and conceptually driven, my work is grounded in traditional painting techniques. In particular, the history of trompe l’oeil painting influences me in its capacity to create complex portraits of people, culture, and society through the illusionistic representation of quotidian objects. Drawing on this legacy through multiple lenses—whether focused on the absence of women from the art historical canon or the integration of trauma into everyday life—my installations explore historical narratives complicated by erasure, memory, translation, geography, and time.

My current project, “Various Records,” utilizes a variety of approaches including video, trompe l’oeil painting, and sculpture to look at the physical and psychological relationships between war, trauma, suffering and everyday life through multiple records: a film my Jewish grandfather made while serving as an army psychiatrist during World War II, the record of my own journey retracing his path through Europe using the film as my guide, as well as the familiar narrative of World War II constructed by institutions, books, and other media.

A recent project, “A Still Life,” combines trompe l’oeil painting, sculpture, and drawing to unite varying perceptions of the past in relation to the visibility of female artists. The project is based on three accounts: the presumed history of the overlooked American Impressionist Lilla Cabot Perry, my own experience during a residency in Perry’s former painting studio in France, and the dominant narrative of art history in which Perry is notable for her absence.

All of my work is driven by my deep interest in overlooked or lesser-known narratives that exist within primary accounts of the past, and to which I have physical and psychological connections. The overlap between my research subjects and my own physical activities with respect to that research is where my work functions, offering a reconsideration of our perception of the past and its construction.

Using painting, sculpture, and other media, I create installations that engage personal and shared histories to examine how knowledge, memory, and history are constructed and mediated. While research-based and conceptually driven, my work is grounded in traditional painting techniques. In particular, the history of trompe l’oeil painting influences me in its capacity to create complex portraits of people, culture, and society through the illusionistic representation of quotidian objects. Drawing on this legacy through multiple lenses—whether focused on the absence of women from the art historical canon or the integration of trauma into everyday life—my installations explore historical narratives complicated by erasure, memory, translation, geography, and time.

My current project, “Various Records,” utilizes a variety of approaches including video, trompe l’oeil painting, and sculpture to look at the physical and psychological relationships between war, trauma, suffering and everyday life through multiple records: a film my Jewish grandfather made while serving as an army psychiatrist during World War II, the record of my own journey retracing his path through Europe using the film as my guide, as well as the familiar narrative of World War II constructed by institutions, books, and other media.

A recent project, “A Still Life,” combines trompe l’oeil painting, sculpture, and drawing to unite varying perceptions of the past in relation to the visibility of female artists. The project is based on three accounts: the presumed history of the overlooked American Impressionist Lilla Cabot Perry, my own experience during a residency in Perry’s former painting studio in France, and the dominant narrative of art history in which Perry is notable for her absence.

All of my work is driven by my deep interest in overlooked or lesser-known narratives that exist within primary accounts of the past, and to which I have physical and psychological connections. The overlap between my research subjects and my own physical activities with respect to that research is where my work functions, offering a reconsideration of our perception of the past and its construction.