American Paradise

American Paradise is a new project that reframes the history of the Hudson River School to give visibility to the many women who were affiliated with this iconic movement but who have been largely omitted from the canon. The title of the project–invoked critically–takes its name from American Paradise: The World of the Hudson River School, an exhibition catalog published in 1987 by the Met that perpetuates the mythology of the Hudson River School as being founded by, and exclusively comprised of, men.

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American Paradise is a new project that reframes the history of the Hudson River School to give visibility to the many women who were affiliated with this iconic movement but who have been largely omitted from the canon. The title of the project–invoked critically–takes its name from American Paradise: The World of the Hudson River School, an exhibition catalog published in 1987 by the Met that perpetuates the mythology of the Hudson River School as being founded by, and exclusively comprised of, men. In fact, as early as 1818—seven years before its ostensible founding in 1825—women were painting scenes of the Catskills and beyond in styles ascribed to the movement’s “founding fathers,” Asher Durand and Thomas Cole.

One part of American Paradise is a series of paintings called Value Studies that reference paintings by several women who hiked and painted alongside—and often apart from—the men affiliated with this movement. I call these new paintings Value Studies because it’s a play on the basic painting and drawing exercise while simultaneously referring to the content of my work; these paintings are meant to give value and visibility to the many women and works that have been largely absent from the dominant narrative of the Hudson River School. Executed in the tradition of copying exemplary paintings, my paintings take the form of in-progress copies to make visible the act of historical recovery and acknowledge it as never finished.

View Exhibitions:
Value Studies at PATRON
ID: Formations of the Self at the Shirley Fiterman Art Center

View Press and Other Texts:
“When is a Painting?” Art-agenda
Interview with Lisa Panzera for ID: Formations of the Self
Press Release for Value Studies at PATRON

Value Study 1: A View of the Catskill Mountain House / Copied from a picture by S. Cole copied from a picture by T. Cole / 1848
2020
Oil and graphite on canvas
15 3/8 x 23 7/16 inches
Photo: Etienne Frossard
Value Study 1: A View of the Catskill Mountain House / Copied from a picture by S. Cole copied from a picture by T. Cole / 1848 (detail)
Photo: Etienne Frossard
Value Study 1: A View of the Catskill Mountain House / Copied from a picture by S. Cole copied from a picture by T. Cole / 1848 (detail)
Photo: Etienne Frossard
Value Study 2: Niagara Falls / Copied from a picture by Minot / 1818
2021
Oil and graphite on linen
30 x 40 3/4 inches
Photo: Aron Gent
Value Study 2: Niagara Falls / Copied from a picture by Minot / 1818 (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent
Value Study 2: Niagara Falls / Copied from a picture by Minot / 1818 (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent
Copies from The Young Ladies’ Assistant in Painting and Drawing, 1833 (version 1)
2021
Carbon pencil on paper
Framed: 11 3/4h x 14 1/4w x 1 1/2d inches
Photo: Aron Gent
Copies from The Young Ladies’ Assistant in Painting and Drawing, 1833 (version 1) (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent
Copies from The Young Ladies’ Assistant in Painting and Drawing, 1833 (version 1) (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent

Video walkthrough of Value Studies, my 2021 solo show at PATRON.

Value Study 1: A View of the Catskill Mountain House / Copied from a picture by S. Cole copied from a picture by T. Cole / 1848
2020
Oil and graphite on canvas
15 3/8 x 23 7/16 inches
Photo: Etienne Frossard
Value Study 1: A View of the Catskill Mountain House / Copied from a picture by S. Cole copied from a picture by T. Cole / 1848 (detail)
Photo: Etienne Frossard
Value Study 1: A View of the Catskill Mountain House / Copied from a picture by S. Cole copied from a picture by T. Cole / 1848 (detail)
Photo: Etienne Frossard
Value Study 2: Niagara Falls / Copied from a picture by Minot / 1818
2021
Oil and graphite on linen
30 x 40 3/4 inches
Photo: Aron Gent
Value Study 2: Niagara Falls / Copied from a picture by Minot / 1818 (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent
Value Study 2: Niagara Falls / Copied from a picture by Minot / 1818 (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent
Copies from The Young Ladies’ Assistant in Painting and Drawing, 1833 (version 1)
2021
Carbon pencil on paper
Framed: 11 3/4h x 14 1/4w x 1 1/2d inches
Photo: Aron Gent
Copies from The Young Ladies’ Assistant in Painting and Drawing, 1833 (version 1) (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent
Copies from The Young Ladies’ Assistant in Painting and Drawing, 1833 (version 1) (detail)
Photo: Aron Gent

Video walkthrough of Value Studies, my 2021 solo show at PATRON.

American Paradise

American Paradise is a new project that reframes the history of the Hudson River School to give visibility to the many women who were affiliated with this iconic movement but who have been largely omitted from the canon. The title of the project–invoked critically–takes its name from American Paradise: The World of the Hudson River School, an exhibition catalog published in 1987 by the Met that perpetuates the mythology of the Hudson River School as being founded by, and exclusively comprised of, men.

Read More

American Paradise is a new project that reframes the history of the Hudson River School to give visibility to the many women who were affiliated with this iconic movement but who have been largely omitted from the canon. The title of the project–invoked critically–takes its name from American Paradise: The World of the Hudson River School, an exhibition catalog published in 1987 by the Met that perpetuates the mythology of the Hudson River School as being founded by, and exclusively comprised of, men. In fact, as early as 1818—seven years before its ostensible founding in 1825—women were painting scenes of the Catskills and beyond in styles ascribed to the movement’s “founding fathers,” Asher Durand and Thomas Cole.

One part of American Paradise is a series of paintings called Value Studies that reference paintings by several women who hiked and painted alongside—and often apart from—the men affiliated with this movement. I call these new paintings Value Studies because it’s a play on the basic painting and drawing exercise while simultaneously referring to the content of my work; these paintings are meant to give value and visibility to the many women and works that have been largely absent from the dominant narrative of the Hudson River School. Executed in the tradition of copying exemplary paintings, my paintings take the form of in-progress copies to make visible the act of historical recovery and acknowledge it as never finished.

View Exhibitions:
Value Studies at PATRON
ID: Formations of the Self at the Shirley Fiterman Art Center

View Press and Other Texts:
“When is a Painting?” Art-agenda
Interview with Lisa Panzera for ID: Formations of the Self
Press Release for Value Studies at PATRON